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Minox Accessories

Minox Tripod | Minox Tripod Head Adptr | Minox Copy Stand | Minox Binocular Attchmt
Minox Right Angle Attchmt | Minox Waist Level Viewer | Minox Hotshoe Adptr | Minox Colour Filters
Minox Loupe | Minox Negative Cutter | Minox Negative Viewer | Minox Slitter | Minox Exposure Meter
Minox Cases | Minox Flash Units | Minox Fan Flash | Minox Measuring Chain | Sales Case

 

 

Minox Tripod

This tripod has got to be one of the smartest ever made. The middle leg unscrews from within the largest leg; the small leg unscrews from within the middle leg; the cable release unscrews from within the small leg. The two detachable legs then screw back into the head of the tripod and voila, you have your complete tripod stand. When screwed back into the carrying position it is no larger than an average pen!

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Minox Tripod Head Adapter

This allows the camera to be attached to the tripod. See above picture.
Below you can see examples of both the standard Minox Tripod Adapter and the VEF Riga adapter. The Riga adapteris extremely rare and much sought after

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Minox Copy Stand

Known as a reprostativ in German, this accessory is used primarily for the copying of documents. If you look carefully at the picture shown beside, the way by which it works is quite self-explanatory.

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Minox Binocular Attachment

Another one of the seven wonders of the photographic world! This ingenious device allows a pair of binoculars to be attached to the camera. The camera lens is now looking through the binocular lens. You use the available binocular lens to focus in on the object you wish to photograph and voila you have a telephoto lens allowing you to take shots at a distance!

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Minox Right Angle Attachment

This device is designed to allow you to take candid photos. By use of a sharp right angle mirror set up, the camera will effectively take pictures around a corner; or while you appear to be photographing an object in front of you, you are actually photographing something to your side. These were originally spy cameras, after all.

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Minox Waist Level Viewer

This accessory allows you to view-find from above the camera without actually placing your eye up against the cameras view finder window.

Below is a Minox View Finder of the plastic variety.

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Minox Hot Shoe Adapter

This little device slots on the end of your camera, allowing you to use almost any standard electronic flash unit. Of course, it can only be used on those cameras that have built in flash synch.

The hotshoe adapter allows any standard flash unit to be used with your Minox camera.

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Minox Colour Filters

Various clip-on colour filters were produced to help with light conditions; a particularly useful selection were made for black and white photography.


Here is another type of filter set made for the later model cameras.

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Minox Loupe

Allows magnified inspection of your negatives.

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Minox Negative Cutter

As itsī name would suggest this item allows you to cut the negatives individually while seeing them through a magnifying lens to make things easier.

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Minox Negative Viewer

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Minox Slitter

The Minox Slitter is another work of art. It allows you to take any type of film and accurately into 8 x 11 submimi format. Having done this you feed your slit film into empty film cartridges and you have a home made roll of film. It is not generally considered to be a mind- boggling money saver, but it does allow you to use your favourite kind of film, which may not be available as standard produced.

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Minox Exposure Meter

This is a small exposure meter for measuring light when using the Minox Riga, lll or llls, none of which were equipped with built- in meters.

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Minox Cases

All the Minox cameras were supplied with cases. Various designs were made, the most common being the standard ever-ready case. A belt case was also produced, allowing the camera to be worn on onesī belt, but these are quite rare and hard to find, as well as being expensive due to their rarity. It is common practice for Minoxers to substitute the belt case with swiss army knifecases and the likes.

Below you can see a picture of a standard belt-case, which at first glance looks very much like an ever- ready case.

Below is a rather unusual Minox Riga case.

Here is a case for carrying both camera and accessories!

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Minox Flash Units

Several different flash units were produced for Minox cameras. The BC flash shown in the first picture uses flash bulbs and fits most Minox submimi cameras; this flash is also the most common and least expensive. Other flash units include the ME 1 Flash that is an electronic flash using itsī own rechargable battery pack for power and small independent electronic flash photo - ME 1 Flash Unit units using small disposable batteries for power. The ME 1 is shown in the second picture.

Here is the ME 2 Flash, the successor to the ME 1

Below is a C 4 Cube Flash Unit that used that uses small flash cubes.

 

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Minox Fan Flash


Picture kindly provided by Mark Tharp.

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Minox Measuring Chain

The measuring chain has two purposes, the bi-purpose is that it safely attaches the camera to the user, so that the camera cannot be dropped. The actual purpose of this chain is to allow you to accurately measure distance between camera and object when carrying out extreme close up and macro-photography. The chain sports small notches at specified distance spacing. Using the notches you can quickly calculate distance and thereby optimize your focusing.

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Sales Case

Below is something rather unusual: it is a Minox Sales Representatives Case containing a Minox B and accessories. These were provided for travelling salesmen and contained either a Minox B or C.

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This site was originally designed and produced by Duncan McMorrin.